Five Food Groups Not Normally Associated With Preparing Healthy Meals

Here is a different take on preparing healthy meals for you and your family.

Our bodies are complex organic machines which can more than comfortably handle fats, carbohydrates, protein and anything else you might once have thought to be “unhealthy”, as long as we don’t continually barrage our bodies with heavily processed foods containing ingredients which act as toxins in our bodies.

It is only in very recent times that doctors have started to learn of this research and start to encourage their patients to more healthy meals containing much less of this one core ingredient, which is eaten by almost everyone, every day, without even realizing it.

So what is this critical ingredient?

Sugar – more specifically, Fructose which makes up approximately half of sugar as we know it.

Sugar is in basic terms 50% Glucose and 50% Fructose, and while Glucose is fine, the Fructose is now known to be a toxin in our systems.

So, while we have been diligently preparing what we have believed to be nutritionally balanced and healthy meals for our families, what we have been quite oblivious to is that sugar is contained in just about every processed food and condiment we place in front of our families daily.

Take Tomato and BBQ sauce – Eaten almost daily. These sauces contain more sugar than a can of soft drink, and that is way more than we need or our bodies can handle.

The challenge of creating healthy meals which contain minimal sugar but still taste great.

As mentioned in the title of this article, there are five core food groups we can turn to as a great starting points for creating delicious healthy meals the whole family will love. There are some basic foods you will also need to avoid if you are to create meals which are truly healthy, particularly for our kids.

Good foods which have no or low Fructose are:

Full fat dairy products:

Milk, cream, cheeses, yoghurt and butter all contain Lactose, a form of sugar which we have no trouble metabolizing and is not “bad” for us. Just don’t add flavourings (eg; flavoured milk or yoghurt) as the flavourings contain Fructose.

All meats:

Lamb, Pork, Beef, and all Game meats are fine as are Fish, Chicken Turkey, and Game birds. None contain fructose, and while lean is good, don’t panic about removing all the fat, as our bodies are comfortable with “managing” these types of fats.

Vegetables:

Most vegetables are low in Fructose and are great natural sources of natural vitamins and minerals and go perfectly with the foods mentioned above. Vegetables are a great healthy snack when eaten raw as well, so start encouraging your kids to eat vegetable “snacks” instead of heading straight to the pantry.

Eggs:

Eggs are a great source of protein and despite what we may have been told, are a healthy ingredient in any form.

Water:

No surprise here, but all too often our kids head straight for juices or sweet fizzy drinks which are loaded with sugar, so try changing to drinking water or milk with your meals.

So in a nutshell, the best and most healthy meals will contain some or all of the foods groups noted above. A good basic rule to work to is “if it tastes sweet, it most likely contains sugar, so avoid it if you can”.

Healthy Meal Plans For Those on the Go

Most people try to eat healthy. No one intentionally starts their day with a list of bad foods they are going to try to eat before they collapse into bed at night. The problem with healthy eating is that many people don’t take the time necessary to create healthy meal plans for those on the go that will fit their lifestyles or habits.

The first step for planning a healthy meal involves knowing what, and when a person is eating. It is important to spend a week writing down everything that one eats. Some people drink three or four cups of coffee in the morning, have a donut at work for breakfast, and eat a granola bar or three before lunch. They don’t have a lot of time, so most grab a quick burger and fries for lunch. After eating the rest of the box of granola bars in the afternoon, around three they’ll eat a candy bar or two so they will have the energy to go home and eat something that they either have picked up or can cook in less than thirty minutes. After dinner, they may have to go to a meeting where they will drink more coffee, have cake or cookies, then go home and go to bed after a relaxing bowl of ice cream.

When this person jumps on the healthy eating wagon, two things are going to happen immediately. First, they will start experiencing an excruciating headache because they will be cutting out an enormous amount of sugar that their body has become addicted to. Secondly, they will experience withdrawal symptoms from the chemicals that they have become addicted to that are contained in all of the fast and junk food they’ve been eating.

For these reasons, and the fact that the term “healthy meals” is associated with a lot of time intensive work, most people don’t eat healthy. Effective healthy meal plans must begin with the assumption that the person planning the meals has been eating for awhile. They must include a “plan” that includes ways to avoid the cravings, withdrawal, and headaches that follow getting off bad foods “cold turkey”.

The key to healthy meal plans for those on the go is to start simply. Some people find that planning one part of their meals at a time and following the plan for a week or two, then gradually expanding to include more meals, is much more successful than creating a structured meal plan. This is totally a matter of personal style.

Healthy meal plans often do not take into consideration that for many people snacks are a meal. By planning for snacks just as one would for a meal, they will be more successful in implementing an effective plan. So, start creating a healthy meal plan with some basic changes that are going to help the body be prepared for additional healthy meals.